My Blog

An A to Z of Autistic Life: F is for Freedom

I think that most of us probably place great value on our freedom, but we may have only realised how important it is to our wellbeing in the past months when we have had to temporarily lose much of it to avoid the spread of COVID 19. We are not used to living in a way where we are restricted by law from going where we want to go and doing what we want to…

Continue reading

An A to Z of Autistic Life: E is for Exhaustion

All life is tiring. I understand that – I do not know anyone who isn’t tired most of the time, especially during this pandemic. But being autistic seems to come with its own brand of exhaustion, and its own way of dealing with it whether you like it or not. In my experience, mental and emotional exhaustion are much harder to deal with than physical exhaustion. On the all too rare occasions when I exercise…

Continue reading

An A to Z of autistic life: D is for Depression

I knew that I had depression and anxiety many years before I realised that I was autistic. At university I was known as the guy that was usually sitting in the corner with my head in my hands. I have spent far too much of my life worrying about all kinds of things and have been conscious for a long time that I am a generally morose sort of person. I was finally formally diagnosed…

Continue reading

An A to Z of autistic life: C is for Change

I have always found change difficult. I know that it is constant, and often necessary, but that does not mean that I have to like it! My aversion to change is such that I have stayed in situations that were clearly very bad for me for years longer than I should have done. I have resisted change that deep down I could see would be for my own benefit. I have frequently said no to…

Continue reading

An A to Z of Autistic Life: B is for Body Language

  When I was at school, foreign languages were without a doubt my weakest subjects. When I scraped the lowest possible mark that was still a pass in French, I was happier with that than with much better grades in other subjects. Nowadays if I hear or read some French, I can generally pick up a few words and may be able to get the general theme of what is being talked about, but I…

Continue reading

An A to Z of Autistic Life: A is for Awkward

  Autistic people still face many barriers in society and have so much to contribute if only given the chance to do so. Indeed, in these difficult times, different ways of thinking, fresh ideas and seeing the world in an alternative way may be more important than ever. I truly believe that a big step forward in helping autistic people to thrive in the world is to increase knowledge and awareness of what autism is…

Continue reading

That’s great. What’s it for?

Have you ever watched one of those TV shows where people buy the contents of abandoned storage lockers base only on a quick look from the doorway, usually seeing just piles of boxes and odd shaped objects covered in tarps? I could never do it but it can be fun to watch others taking those risks! In most of the shows I have seen, at least one locker turns put to contain some type of…

Continue reading

When autistic behaviour is misunderstood

  I have been in trouble many times. I was frequently in trouble as a child and have not exactly avoided being in trouble in my working life. Nothing too serious or criminal, I would add, but I have been far from well-behaved, at least as far as others are concerned. Sometimes the trouble was well-deserved. I knew that I had done something wrong, and I may very well have known that it would lead…

Continue reading

Why mental illness should be taught in schools

  Why mental illness should be taught in schools is one of those questions that I hope will one day become redundant.  It will be such an obvious priority that people will be aghast that there was a time when it was not taught to all children as part of a full and well-rounded education. There are several reasons why greater education and understanding of mental health and mental illness are needed across society, starting…

Continue reading

Can autistic people work?

If you are new to the world of autism and neurodiversity, perhaps having just discovered that your child or another friend or relative is autistic, it can be a worrying time. You will have lots of questions, like can autistic people work, and it is absolutely the right thing to do to ask them and find out as much as you can. That is the best way to equip yourself to give an autistic person…

Continue reading